The story “August 1977” from Nina Bunjevac’s Heartless has been chosen to be included in the 2014 Best American Comics (edited by Scott McCloud). Hooray, Nina!

The story “August 1977” from Nina Bunjevac’s Heartless has been chosen to be included in the 2014 Best American Comics (edited by Scott McCloud). Hooray, Nina!

Meags Fitzgerald visits Nova Scotia! Read more here: http://www.conundrumpress.com/events/phinding-photobooths/

(Source: sarahburwash)

verwho:

TOWERKIND has been nominated for a 2014 Ignatz Award for outstanding series. I always find incredible new creators through the Ignatz nominations, so please check out that list!
I’m also exceptionally pleased to announce that TOWERKIND will be collected as a complete book, published through Conundrum Press, to debut at TCAF 2015.
My thanks go to the judges: Darryl Ayo, Austin English, Melissa Mendes, Thien Pham and Whit Taylor.
Ignatz Awards are voted for by the attendees of SPX on Saturday, September the 13th. Towerkind is a 160 page story about the kids of St. James Town, a hamlet of high-rises within the city of Toronto, their subtle powers, and the oppressive warning hinted at by birds and bugs, felt in their bones.
You can buy the collected issues of Towerkind on my storenvy - there’s only a few of these single issue collections left, and I won’t be reprinting.
If you’re an SPX exhibitor interested in reading TOWERKIND please send me an email and I will send you a PDF! katherine.verhoeven@gmail.com

verwho:

TOWERKIND has been nominated for a 2014 Ignatz Award for outstanding series. I always find incredible new creators through the Ignatz nominations, so please check out that list!

I’m also exceptionally pleased to announce that TOWERKIND will be collected as a complete book, published through Conundrum Press, to debut at TCAF 2015.

My thanks go to the judges: Darryl Ayo, Austin English, Melissa Mendes, Thien Pham and Whit Taylor.

Ignatz Awards are voted for by the attendees of SPX on Saturday, September the 13th. Towerkind is a 160 page story about the kids of St. James Town, a hamlet of high-rises within the city of Toronto, their subtle powers, and the oppressive warning hinted at by birds and bugs, felt in their bones.

You can buy the collected issues of Towerkind on my storenvy - there’s only a few of these single issue collections left, and I won’t be reprinting.

If you’re an SPX exhibitor interested in reading TOWERKIND please send me an email and I will send you a PDF! katherine.verhoeven@gmail.com

Since its debut, Photobooth: A Biography has received continuous high praise. Recently author Meags Fitzgerald was named as one of CBC’s “Writers to Watch" for 2014.
Here’s a selection of reviews:
"In addition to the richness and vibrancy of the illustrations themselves, Fitzgerald’s book does what any good object biography should, by charting the larger impact photobooths have made around the world." - Michael Hingston, The Edmonton Journal. 
"Fitzgerald pulls off what our favourite teachers seem to do effortlessly: ease us into loving a subject we couldn’t have imagined falling for…Photobooth will have you rooting for the vintage machines. Perhaps this little gem will help transform their imminent fate to become artifacts in beautiful and unpredictable ways." - Alex Bachmayer, Montreal Review of Books.
"One of my biggest fears for Photobooth: A Biography is that it may not have registered on many radars, which is a shame since it is easily one of the best books in recent memory. Rarely has a creator depicted so masterfully — and, might I add, positively — the mindset and sheer love that goes into collecting. If you give this book a chance, and I hope you will, I imagine you’ll be surprised to find that not only is Photobooth exceptionally readable, but that it’s also one of the most intensely moving books to emerge this year.” - Kenneth Kimbrough, The Comics Alternative.
"Meags Fitzgerald’s new graphic memoir Photobooth: A Biography debuted and completely blew me away… It’s a book about a woman who has come to passionately love something so much that it takes over too much of her life — an idea that should resonate with many readers.” - Janelle Asselin, Comics Alliance.

Since its debut, Photobooth: A Biography has received continuous high praise. Recently author Meags Fitzgerald was named as one of CBC’s “Writers to Watch" for 2014.

Here’s a selection of reviews:

"In addition to the richness and vibrancy of the illustrations themselves, Fitzgerald’s book does what any good object biography should, by charting the larger impact photobooths have made around the world." - Michael Hingston, The Edmonton Journal

"Fitzgerald pulls off what our favourite teachers seem to do effortlessly: ease us into loving a subject we couldn’t have imagined falling for…Photobooth will have you rooting for the vintage machines. Perhaps this little gem will help transform their imminent fate to become artifacts in beautiful and unpredictable ways." - Alex Bachmayer, Montreal Review of Books.

"One of my biggest fears for Photobooth: A Biography is that it may not have registered on many radars, which is a shame since it is easily one of the best books in recent memory. Rarely has a creator depicted so masterfully — and, might I add, positively — the mindset and sheer love that goes into collecting. If you give this book a chance, and I hope you will, I imagine you’ll be surprised to find that not only is Photobooth exceptionally readable, but that it’s also one of the most intensely moving books to emerge this year.” - Kenneth Kimbrough, The Comics Alternative.

"Meags Fitzgerald’s new graphic memoir Photobooth: A Biography debuted and completely blew me away… It’s a book about a woman who has come to passionately love something so much that it takes over too much of her life — an idea that should resonate with many readers.” - Janelle Asselin, Comics Alliance.

What We Need To Know is a broad love letter by an experienced creator to his own past and background, however messed up it may be. the book contains grippingly painful moments, which at the same time are sublimely poetic.” - Wim Lockefeer, Forbidden Planet Continental Correspondent

vknid:

Spain and Morocco by Alex Fellows
Flirting with gloom, though never descending into a depressive narrative, Alex Fellows’ Spain And Morocco might be better framed as embarrassing. Embarrassing if you’ve ever been a young, clueless, frustrated guy, which, I believe, accounts for most males of a certain age. And funny, despite the moody shadows cast upon it.
The title refers to two specific trips, one to Spain, one to Morocco, each richly rendered with its own particular drama revolving around the people Walt and Doug meet on their journey. It all begins as a “we’re not tied down, we can do anything” tirade, but what they find is that vacation from life doesn’t mean vacation from reality. People are still very much entrenched in their own psychologies, wherever you meet them.
They think they want adventure, want the unknown, but what they really desire is to shake off the sameness. You don’t have to go to Spain or Morocco to achieve that, but the romanticism of world travel for the young has created a situation where it such journeys have becomes rites of passage where everything changes. That’s a pretty big expectation of anything, especially when what you really desire is some companionship and a night out of your apartment. 
What they find in each location seems like a misadventure at best. Spain yields confusing romantic undertones that might not even really exist, while Morocco hints at real danger and gives the feeling of being on the edge of what an American considers normal life. 
But there is something else going on here, too, something mystical and even evil, that speaks to what lurks inside the sort of  young man the story portrays and what a female might perceive. Satan looms large over the story in unexpected ways, as does the complexity of his appearance, all of which play a part in the cryptic final pages of the book. 
Fellows doesn’t lay it out for anyone, prefer the ending to sit and fester in your brain for awhile, suggesting that the true value of an adventure is not knowing how it will end. That is the unknown Walt and Doug sought, and Fellows is giving it to his readers to share. 
- John Seven

vknid:

Spain and Morocco by Alex Fellows

Flirting with gloom, though never descending into a depressive narrative, Alex Fellows’ Spain And Morocco might be better framed as embarrassing. Embarrassing if you’ve ever been a young, clueless, frustrated guy, which, I believe, accounts for most males of a certain age. And funny, despite the moody shadows cast upon it.

The title refers to two specific trips, one to Spain, one to Morocco, each richly rendered with its own particular drama revolving around the people Walt and Doug meet on their journey. It all begins as a “we’re not tied down, we can do anything” tirade, but what they find is that vacation from life doesn’t mean vacation from reality. People are still very much entrenched in their own psychologies, wherever you meet them.

They think they want adventure, want the unknown, but what they really desire is to shake off the sameness. You don’t have to go to Spain or Morocco to achieve that, but the romanticism of world travel for the young has created a situation where it such journeys have becomes rites of passage where everything changes. That’s a pretty big expectation of anything, especially when what you really desire is some companionship and a night out of your apartment. 

What they find in each location seems like a misadventure at best. Spain yields confusing romantic undertones that might not even really exist, while Morocco hints at real danger and gives the feeling of being on the edge of what an American considers normal life. 

But there is something else going on here, too, something mystical and even evil, that speaks to what lurks inside the sort of  young man the story portrays and what a female might perceive. Satan looms large over the story in unexpected ways, as does the complexity of his appearance, all of which play a part in the cryptic final pages of the book. 

Fellows doesn’t lay it out for anyone, prefer the ending to sit and fester in your brain for awhile, suggesting that the true value of an adventure is not knowing how it will end. That is the unknown Walt and Doug sought, and Fellows is giving it to his readers to share. 

- John Seven

(Source: vknid)

Conundrum Press is thrilled to announce it has acquired world rights to The Disappearance of Charlie Butters, the new graphic novel from zachwortonscrustclub!
Read more here: http://www.conundrumpress.com/news/the-disappearance-of-charlie-butters/

Conundrum Press is thrilled to announce it has acquired world rights to The Disappearance of Charlie Butters, the new graphic novel from zachwortonscrustclub!

Read more here: http://www.conundrumpress.com/news/the-disappearance-of-charlie-butters/